Thursday, 25 August 2016

Fossil Hunters goes on tour



The Fossil Hunters exhibit covering the work of the TW:eed project closed at National Museums Scotland on August 14th after an extremely successful run beginning in February. The exhibit showcases some of the tetrapod, fish and arthropod fossils found by the TW:eed Project and explains how scientists reconstruct the environment they lived in. The exhibit tells the story of how life evolved on land, with specimens from the early Devonian of Rhynie, this project and Carboniferous tetrapods from East Kirkton. My favourite part are the fabric artwork diorama reconstructions of the ancient tetrapod world, they are magnificent!
 
Image copyright Phil Wilkinson

Image copyright Ruth Armstrong Photography

Over 62,000 people visited the exhibit to much acclaim. Visitors to the exhibit included many from overseas, including  significant numbers from the US and Canada, but also France, Poland, Croatia, Indonesia,  China, Venezuela, India, Italy, Mexico,  New Zealand, Germany, Switzerland, Portugal, and Spain. The exhibit clearly appealed to a very wide cross section of the public, and numerous visitor comments reflect the enthusiasm for the research into early tetrapods around the world;

‘Very enlightening. Enjoyed the videos especially, really brings it to life. Reminded me of searching for fossils as a kid – inspired me to look again!’

‘Fascinating, well explained exhibition. Scotland is so special.’

‘Absolutely brilliant – fascinating to make link between science, technology and geology. Love the local links too – great exhibits and easy to understand. 10/10!’

‘One of the most interesting exhibitions I have seen anywhere!’

Components of the exhibit are now set to tour Scotland:
- Biggar and Upper Clydesdale Museum from 15 October 2016 - 15 January 2017
- Montrose Museum and Art Gallery from 21 January - 3 April 2017
- Museum nan Eilean (Lews Castle) from 13 April - 24 June 2017.

If you haven't already seen it I do hope you get the chance!

Until next time
Carys